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Archive for the ‘Australian Wines’ Category

I’ve been noticing more paper-less wine labels at the wine store lately. For oenophiles who like to collect wine labels, you’re out of luck with bottles that feature direct screenprinting aka applied color labeling. The process involves baking the inked design on the bottle in a 1200-degree furnace. These wine labels offer several advantages to wine producers: wraparound designs, perfect registration and no risk of tearing, wrinkling or other marring. I’m betting that graphic designers love the possibilities because their creativity is no longer confined to a paper label.

Here are two examples:

Boogle Shiraz

Boogle Shiraz

Here's what it looks like on side of the bottle

Sideview of bottle

Imported by The Grateful Palate, Baby Roogle Shiraz is the less expensive version of Marquis Phillips Shiraz, from R Wines, which I’ve written about in a previous post. (For a story about the bitter breakup of the Marquis-Phillips partnership in 2006: Wine Spectator.) The roogle is a creature that exists only in the minds of the wine’s creators. Look at the label closely and you’ll see it’s not a bird. A roogle is a cross between an eagle and a kangaroo.

This shiraz is medium-bodied, though not heavy on tannins, and has a smooth, fruity taste. I bought it for $11.

This other label is a hybrid:

tempranillo-label

The fork and the word “Tapeña” are applied using direct screenprinting and seem to float on the wine bottle. The yellow strip is a paper label, as is the one on the back of the wine bottle.

I figured the fork is meant to convey “food friendly.” However, the winemaker has a bigger goal, as demonstrated by the comprehensive web site: get into a Spanish lifestyle. Eat tapas! Tune into some Spanish guitar! Throw a party! Make these recipes! Test your knowledge of Madrid!

This earthy full-bodied wine is made from Tempranillo grapes–known as Spain’s noble grape–grown in the Tierra de Castilla region of Spain, which lies just south of Madrid. If you’ve had rioja, then you’ve had wine made from this grape. The area features hot, arid plains. Tempranillo goes well with grilled meats and salmon. It’s nice on its own, as well.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Tempranillo Wine Facts: Types of Red …“, posted with vodpod

Tapeña Tempranillo also costs in the neighborhood of $11.

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"Paving Way"

"Paving Way"

The whimsy of the drawing on this label caught my eye when I was trawling the wine section of my local supermarket last week. Surprised to see the artist credited on the back label, I bought a bottle of Strong Arms shiraz. Though the wine is from South Australia, the artist is an American.

Mel Kadel is an artist who lives in the Echo Park section of Los Angeles. She shares her studio/apartment, which is a former stagecoach, with her boyfriend, artist Travis Millard. Their studio was featured on the blog Apartment Therapy.

In an interview, Los Angeles artist Mel Kadel describes her style as “mooshy.” When she can’t find old paper, she stains paper with coffee to make it look old and uses pen and ink.

Each of her illustrations tells a story and typically features some version of the same female character. She told Poketo:

I like having a story anchor what I’m working on, but don’t want it to be screaming out. I like thinking about obstacles and getting over them and turning upside down, and trying to keep running forward.

Kadel designed six labels featuring Ms. Strong Arms shiraz for R Wines, founded in 2005 by Dan Philips and Chris Ringland. Imported by The Grateful Palate Imports (http://www.gratefulpalateimports.com/wine/250.html), R Wines is based in Australia.

Kadel is represented by the Richard Heller Gallery in Santa Monica, California. You can view her playful artwork on the gallery’s site. Greeting cards featuring her illustrations are available at Little Paper Airplanes.

As for the shiraz itself, Robert Parker gives it 91 points.

"Foot Bath"

"Foot Bath"

"Touch Down"

"Touch Down"

The Squeeze

The Squeeze

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